AWPA and ICC Approve New Treated Wood Standards

advertisment

ICC-ES AC326 Effective July 15, 2016

NADRA_logo_250Quakertown, PA – Many of you may or may not be aware of the discussions that have been taking place regarding potential changes to Treated Wood Standards moving many structural and critical items to a Ground Contact treatment retention level.

Those New Standards have now passed the AWPA (American Wood Protection Association) and the ICC (International Code Council). The final effective date of implementation is July 15, 2016.

NADRA’s mission is to provide a unified source for the professional development, promotion, growth, and sustenance of the Deck and Railing building industry in North America so that members can exceed the expectations of their customers.

This mission includes the promotion of proper deck construction, deck safety and ultimately serving the best interest of the consumer. While the Association is made up of professionals from all industry segments, we are aware that consumers use a significant amount of treated wood in DIY projects. The consumer is usually not knowledgeable enough to be able to know the proper uses for which treated wood product they are buying and therefore misuse and misapplication can occur.

  • NADRA is fully supportive of the recommended changes.
  • NADRA supports all treated lumber moving to a minimum Ground Contact retention level.
  • NADRA supports and applauds those treated lumber dealers and retailers who have announced moving forward with 100% ground contact inventory.

Ground Contact treatment is necessary for physically above-ground material when:

  • Soil or other debris may build up and stay in contact with the wood
  • There is insufficient ventilation to allow air circulation around the wood
  • Material is installed <6 inches above the ground
  • Material is installed in contact with non-durable untreated or older construction with any evidence of decay
  • Wood is subject to frequent or recurring wetting
  • Wood is used in tropical climates
  • The wood is both:
    • Difficult to maintain, repair or replace and
    • Critical to the performance and safety of the entire system

Joists and beams for decks and docks fit both of these final criteria and therefore require Ground Contact treatment. Other Ground Contact applications include Ledgers, Posts, Step Stringers and Decking used at Ground Level and on Walkways.

For more information from NADRA, email info@NADRA.org or read the full post at http://bit.ly/AWPAICCNewTreatedWoodStandards.